Matchmaking patent activision

matchmaking patent activision

Is Activision’s matchmaking system causing serious problems for players?

There is a reason to believe that Activision’s unique matchmaking system might be a cause for a lot of trouble players face daily. The patents are public, and anybody can view them.

Will Activisions new matchmaking system encourage microtransactions?

Gaming Reviews, News, Tips and More. Gaming Reviews, News, Tips and More. A patent granted to Activision outlines a new matchmaking system that would pair players together in order to encourage microtransactions.

What is Activision’s new patent for a microtransaction game?

First reported by Rolling Stone, the patent, filed in 2015 and granted on October 17 of this year, outlines a process in which computer algorithms can match players together in order to increase the likelihood of microtransaction purchases. Update 7:15 P.M: An Activision Publishing spokesperson has responded to Kotaku with the following statement:

Are Activision’s public patents filing a threat to call of Duty players?

Public patent images filed by Activision in 2019 are raising concerns among Call of Duty players. There is a reason to believe that Activision’s unique matchmaking system might be a cause for a lot of trouble players face daily. The patents are public, and anybody can view them.

Is Activision’s matchmaking system causing problems for Call of Duty players?

Public patent images filed by Activision in 2019 are raising concerns among Call of Duty players. There is a reason to believe that Activision’s unique matchmaking system might be a cause for a lot of trouble players face daily.

Are the call of duty patents public?

The patents are public, and anybody can view them. Therefore, many people on the internet have provided their views on it. A simple YouTube search will reveal several videos where the Call of Duty community is actively busy in exposing the American studio.

What is Activision’s new patent for a microtransaction game?

First reported by Rolling Stone, the patent, filed in 2015 and granted on October 17 of this year, outlines a process in which computer algorithms can match players together in order to increase the likelihood of microtransaction purchases. Update 7:15 P.M: An Activision Publishing spokesperson has responded to Kotaku with the following statement:

What does drift0r’s patent mean for the gaming industry?

YouTuber Drift0r debunked a patent in one of his videos and explained what this process intends to do. According to him, talented players need better aim and accuracy with progression inside the game. They need to constantly keep making themselves better at the game to maintain steady performance.

Related posts: